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Working Ranch April/May 2016

BY GILDA V. BRYANT It may take over 60 days for a batch of mineral to make it from the manufacturer, to the feed store loading dock, and into the back of your pickup. LORI MARTIN/SHUTTERSTOCK – OLD FEED STORE, WAXAHACHIE, TX hether in bags, blocks, tubs or a syringe, minerals are important to health, reproduction and optimum production of beef cattle. Although minerals do not degrade, some additives do, especially when subjected to sunlight and extreme temperatures. Protecting these products from ultraviolet (UV) light is a must to prolong their effi cacy and shelf life. Jeff Hill, PhD, Commercial Beef Business Manager with ADM, says that although all minerals are stable, they are oxidative by nature. That causes vitamins, and other additives such as insect growth regulator (IGR) for fl y control to deteriorate. “Because of their ability to degrade, keep the bags fresh,” Hill explains. “Ideally, don’t buy a product and store it for excessive periods of time… a good rule of thumb for most bagged minerals is to try not to let it get past 60 days, if at all possible, and not more than six months from time of manufacture. Maybe it sits at the warehouse, then goes to a dealer. When the producer stocks up, it can be 60 to 90 days old.” 36 I WORKING RANCH I APRIL / MAY 2016


Working Ranch April/May 2016
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