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Working Ranch April/May 2016

Keeping true to their forefather’s pioneering spirit, the Josefi aks have also begun to incorporate subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) technology to their farmland. This emerging irrigation method involves buried drip line being ripped into the soil and allows for signifi cantly more effi cient utilization of water by crops and decreases the total amount of water needed due to minimized evaporation. GREAT MANAGEMENT TEAM As one would imagine, effi ciently running a diversifi ed operation the size of Josefi ak’s requires a lot of good help. Each family member contributes different talents and interests into the business and the end result is a management team that would be the envy of most corporate human resource managers. For starters, the family claims three doctors of veterinary medicine (DVMs) among their ranks. Nikki, her husband Aaron Larson, and Kory’s wife, Heather, all graduated from Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. They’re uniquely qualifi ed to assist with any and all aspects of herd health, management and nutrition. Kory is the lead stockman at the background yard and he inherited his grandfather’s love of handling cattle on horseback. In addition to managing animal health concerns for the ranch, Nikki and Aaron own Cache Creek Veterinary Service where they visit customers on site. Heather also works part time at a veterinary clinic in a small town just west of the ranch. Equal to the animal health knowledge in the family, Ty helps with the cattle as needed, but prefers farming. He is a part time commodity trader for a fi rm in town and moonlights as a high school basketball coach. Ty’s wife, Kayla, is a high school biology teacher who grew up on her family’s ranch near Wheaton, Kansas, and is a good hand when needed. Erin spends much of her time taking care of the cowherd and is an ace combine operator during harvest. Erin’s long-time boyfriend, Aaron Beckwith, is a regular fi xture on the ranch, hauling cattle and commodities for the Josefi aks. “I would say we go wherever we’re needed,” Kory shares. When he’s not taking care of cattle or farming, Richard spends the majority of his days managing the business aspects of the operation. “Dad keeps up on all the paperwork and does business in town, which is what everyone else tries to pass off on him,” Kory adds. Laurie pays the bills and relishes her role as a ranch grandma caring for the grandchildren, including Aaron and Nikki’s twins Rylie and Josie, and son, Kade, and Kory and Heather’s boys Cooper and Tate. The ranch also employs two fulltime hired employees. Joe Hoffman has worked for Josefi aks for 23 years and his son, Joe Jr. or “Little Joe,” works alongside his dad as well. “These two employees are defi - nitely vital to our operation and have worked here long enough that they’re basically family,” Kory says. It’s rare to fi nd a ranching family that can incorporate one or two, let alone four children and their families. With each member pursing APRIL / MAY 2016 I WORKING RANCH I 59


Working Ranch April/May 2016
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