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Working Ranch April/May 2016

The cowherd is given pregguard and a vibrio-lepto shot as well as an injectable wormer in the spring to try and cut down on pasture contamination. THE BEST PART While grateful for the well-managed prairie, crops, cattle and infrastructure his family has built, Richard still feels he and Laurie’s greatest accomplishment and asset are their children and their families. “There’s nothing unique about our operation, except for our kids,” he says. “The grandkids are coming on. Every one of my kids is involved in it, and you don’t see that too often. I’m just glad we have room for all the kids. I don’t know if we’ll have room for all the grandkids. That’s going to take some more work.” The children agree that another round of expansion will likely be necessary at some point in time in order to keep the ranch viable for all. “The hardest part is trying to fi nd land to be able to continue to expand. I’m just hoping that they’ll be able to,” Richard says. “It seems in our area it’s really tough to get more pasture. We’re not in an area that has a lot of rangeland.” For the Josefi aks, being a good steward of both the land and livestock will Dale Josefi ak, Richard’s father, began using central pivot irrigation as far back as the late 1960’s. continue to pay dividends. “It’s the way you take care of the land and the importance of land,” Richard says. “You have livestock and you take care of them, and they become a part of you. They’re just like humans. You take care of them and they’ll take care of you.” APRIL / MAY 2016 I WORKING RANCH I 63


Working Ranch April/May 2016
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