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Working Ranch April/May 2016

product merit. 98% of the bulls we produce are purchased by commercial beef producers in the region, so their needs drive our genetic selection and bull development programs. October is a convergence of sorts for all segments of our ranching operation. We’re calving the fall herd, weaning the springs and preparing bulls for our annual auction in November. Fall crops are being harvested and wheat is being sown. And we are helping customers market their calves and select their next generation of genetics. It is a very busy time, but a fulfi lling one, nevertheless. 12-DAY JOURNAL OF MATT PERRIER TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2015 I’m up at 5:30, put on coffee and get bacon started for breakfast. Today we’re fertility testing bulls for this fall’s sale, so I will be gone before the kids get up. Regardless of what the WHO experts announced this month, bacon will be my way of saying “I love you” to the family this morning. Amy will be off to work as the school district’s Physical Therapist and will take the kids to school. I would list all of her jobs around here, but there wouldn’t be enough space, so I’ll just list her main one: she’s our “rock.” Thanks for always being there, Amy. Got started testing bulls a little after 7. Warm day for this time of year. We were a bit shorthanded, since our cowman, Eric Burden, had jury duty and a son who had knee surgery the day prior, but all went pretty smoothly and the bulls tested well. After we fi nished, I inventoried vaccine and ordered more for vaccinating fall pairs later in the week. Visited with Dad about a neighbor who is selling some pasture and then headed home to shower, visit with the family and listen to the Kansas City Royals, who were in the AL Division Championships. I helped Amy make some spaghetti for supper and then sent an invoice to a customer who just bought some registered females from us. I went to bed about 9:30 after a good day. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21 Up at 5:45, coffee and breakfast started. Saddled a young mare, Caliente and met Eric south of his house and drifted 45 heifer calf pairs across the road to the fescue traps near our “Repro facility” where we do most of our ET and AI work. Had a few bad eyes to treat in the weaned heifer calves, so we roped and doctored them before lunch. It was a bit more action than I had planned for the young mare today, but she did well. After lunch Eric and I moved the hydraulic chute to the Corbin pasture, where we will work the cow pairs tomorrow. That evening, I fi nalized our ET donor and recipient cow selections so we could sort them from the group and begin their synchronization regime. Hit the sack about 10:00. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22 5:30 wakeup call again, coffee and breakfast. I saddled my 9 year-old gelding, Buckaroo. Eric picked me up about 6:30, we loaded the last few items for working pairs and headed to the Corbin pasture. Met Glen Collinge, local cowboy and comedian, at the gate about 6:45. Still black as night, but by the time we set up a few panels, the east horizon was beginning to show some color. Immunized and dewormed the cows and Amy showed up about 11 a.m. with lunch, so we ate a quick sandwich on the pickups. We talked Amy into sticking around to help work calves. We sorted our ET pairs from the group, and turned everyone else back together in the pen to pair up. I headed home for a much-needed shower. Practiced spelling words with Lyle and Hannah, helped tuck everyone into bed and headed back to the The Dalebanks, Angus Cowman, Eric Burden, moving weaned heifer calves to pasture. 66 I WORKING RANCH I APRIL / MAY 2016


Working Ranch April/May 2016
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