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Working Ranch April/May 2016

can’t ranch seven days a week. He doesn’t have to have the time to do his own cow movement for pasture rotation. He turns the cows out, and the association hands do about 85 percent of the management.” Association members take turns helping with big moves, like when the cattle are going to or coming off the mountain. This has people coming once or twice for work days during the summer. For the fall roundup members are required to bring one hand per 50 head. ROUNDUP ON A SCHEDULE As it’s a seasonal job, the association sees a fair amount of turnover of their hands. “Most guys don’t have the luxury of working for six months a year,” Zakotnik continues. “When the association fi rst started any cattle crossing county lines had to be brand inspected. There weren’t customary permits for in-state range movement. “The area brand supervisor at the time was Glen Miller, and he would make every cow boss a brand inspector to oversee the association cattle being shipped. Well, we were changing managers so often Glen couldn’t keep his books straight. “So one day he drove in the yard, threw the box of books out of his car and said, ‘You’re up there anyway, (Top) Seth Jones, Tiffany Mines and Nancy Moon bring cattle up the alley to be sorted according to owner. (Above) When you hear “COWBOYS” called out across the corral, that means mount up and bring more cattle from the holding pen into the system. APRIL / M MAY 2016 I WORKING RANCH I 77


Working Ranch April/May 2016
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