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Working Ranch - March 2018

GET DONE FASTER. Your Post Pounding Crew. WHEATHEART POST POUNDERS: RENEGADE | OUTLAW | BANDIT | SHERIFF | REBEL Livestock, vineyards, or orchards - whatever your fencing needs are, Wheatheart Post-Pounders will get the job done fast. Whether it’s the Renegade (trailer model), Bandit (3PT hitch), Sheriff (free standing skid steer), or the Outlaw (self-contained 3PT model), Wheatheart’s crew is lined up and ready to go! 877.667.7421 | wheatheart.com offered novel-endophyte cultivars, and some livestock producers have been transitioning from toxic fescue to the new varieties. Establishing a novel endophyte will take one year of management before a pasture or grazing area can be used. However, killing old cultivars like Kentucky 31 requires an “all-out assault.” “Toxic fescue is hardy, that’s what livestock owners like about it,” Roberts states. “Total eradication of a toxic fescue in a fi eld is required before planting a new novel-endophyte.” Herbicide will kill cultivars like Kentucky 31, but it takes more than one application. Generally, glyphosate is most effective on actively growing toxic fescue. Roberts also recommends using a spray-smother-spray approach to effectively eradicate toxic fescue. “Typically, a pasture with toxic fescue can be sprayed in spring to get the eradication process started,” suggests Roberts. “After one week, an annual cereal grass cover crop can be drilled into the pasture.” The cover crop provides some summer grazing, but most importantly, when toxic fescue seeds in the ground sprout during summer, a cover crop will smother seedlings. Cover crop options should include varieties with canopies that allow light to penetrate the stand and reach any volunteer seedlings and tillers that escaped herbicide treatment. “The few survivors of the fi rst herbicide application need to be healthy and growing so the second application will kill them,” says Roberts. The fi nal eradication step is a fall spraying that kills the cover crop and any tough toxic fescue tillers and seedlings that survived the fi rst spray and smothering phase. “Nearly everyone comes up with a way to shorten this process,” Roberts shares. “But many shortcuts don’t work on toxic fescue. This eradication ‘recipe’ is time-tested and should be followed.” U OF GEORGIA WEIGHS IN A spray-wait-spray method, developed at the University of Georgia, has been effective in the southern U.S. Spraying timing is key in the success of this approach. Three steps in the spraywait spray method include clipping old tall fescue seed heads in spring; spraying the fi eld in summer; spraying it again before planting a novel-endophyte. “The University of Georgia has found that herbicide applications should be at least six weeks apart,” Roberts recommends. “To plan the eradication, determine when the fi nal application will be made and subtract at least six weeks to identify the fi rst application date.” In selecting a new novel-endophyte, Roberts advises guarding against being persuaded to plant MARCH 2018 I WORKING RANCH I 31


Working Ranch - March 2018
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