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Working Ranch - March 2018

Carissa Munn could never shake the sand from her boots. Neither she nor her ranchraised husband Phil were content in their well-paid town jobs, so they asked her parents if there was room for them to fi t in. That request was the answer to her parents’ 30 year-long prayer. Two-thirds of the Myers’ heifers are retained and wintered on range, plus supplemental hay and cake. In the spring, they’ll be turned out with the bulls for 45 days and sold at a later date. COURTESY CARISSA MUNN “If you don’t have a plan…” real smooth transition. I know now that it could have been made easier,” Lynn adds, explaining how the experience helped fuel a desire to provide his own kids with some kind of plan. However, the desire really didn’t catch fi re for another three decades. It was kindled in part by Lynn’s own bout with ill health, but largely by a question from daughter Carissa and her husband, Phillip Munn. After spending 10 years pursuing careers outside of agriculture, the younger couple asked if there was any way that they could join the ranching operation. ANSWER TO A PRAYER “My answer was ‘What day can you be here?’” grins Lynn. “For Marlene and me, it was an answer to 30 years of prayer.” Like a lot of ranch folk, Lynn and Marlene had long hoped that their children would be interested in the family ranching legacy, but they encouraged Carissa and her brother, Creston, to pursue their own dreams. While both young people were proud of their ranch roots, each chose a professional career. Creston became an optometrist and married a physician (Terri). Carissa earned a doctorate in physical therapy and became director of rehabilitation for a regional hospital, while husband Phil garnered top wages as a diesel mechanic. Considering the income-earning 72 I WORKING RANCH I MARCH 2018


Working Ranch - March 2018
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