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Working Ranch - March 2018

$GPGſVU$GQPFVJG4CPEJ “Water is probably one of the most “As we become more conservation minded all the time, we’re working harder and harder to improve water quality and water fl ow rates,” explains Dusty Hahn. “That means we’re able to leave a little something more for downstream, and it’s of a higher quality. That’s just the right thing to do.” WHERE THE FUTURE OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT BEGINS At TCU, we don’t just produce great ranchers. We train serious resource managers to tackle the challenges of our rapidly changing global industry. Combining more than 50 years of tradition with the latest in ranching education, the TCU Ranch Management program offers nine months of intensive training both in the classroom and in the field. To learn more about our programs and scholarship opportunities, visit www.ranch.tcu.edu or call 817-257-7145. precious resources, especially in the West,” Dusty says. “So anything that we can do to conserve and enhance that resource, we’re interested in. It helps everybody along the watershed of the Missouri and ultimately that drains into the Mississippi, and that’s important for us as agriculturalists.” Clean, cold, connected waters with healthy fi sheries indicate a healthy watershed, which is a nod to those who manage the land and livestock around it, Spoon says: “Chuck and his family provide a valuable example of how a long-term ranching operation can simultaneously create agricultural products and foster clean water.” The Hahns are quick to point out it’s a nod to the entire community. “To enhance the watershed, you’ve got to be able to pull all the pieces together. It takes everyone in the valley,” Chuck says. “It’s one of those things that just won’t happen without all the right people involved.” He points back to the conservation district and FWP leaders they worked with, and the other landowners who came forward with the same patience to work through 25 years of negotiations and hard work to see an entire watershed blossom. It was recently the fi rst of its kind to be removed from the DEQ’s “Total Maximum Daily Load” listing thanks to its plan to reduce nonpoint source sediment pollution. “Seeing that watershed thriving; that’s been a real bright spot in my lifetime,” Chuck says. “Water is such an important thing in these valleys, especially to us as irrigators. But to work with general public through some of these programs so we can maintain our water and still add some benefi t for recreation, too – that’s good for everybody.” OVERTAKEN, BUT NOT OVERWHELMED Devastating. That’s one way to describe the events caused by the wave of fl oodwater in the valley in the 1950s. Canyon Ferry Lake was formed with the completion of the Canyon Ferry Dam in 1954. It fl ooded the small town of Canton and 37 ranches along the Missouri River, including the 1,100 acres Chuck’s grandfather, Stephen 78 I WORKING RANCH I MARCH 2018


Working Ranch - March 2018
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