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Working Ranch - March 2018

BREED: Pinzgauer COLOR: Dark red or black with a wide white stripe running the length of the back, as well as white markings on the tail, chest, udder, and abdomen. They may be horned or polled and have pigmented skin. ORIGINS: The Pinzgauer ancestors come from the Austrian Alps where Alpine herdsmen began the development of the red and white breed around 500 AD. Over generations the cattle became larger than their native red ancestors, and were brown and spotted. The color pattern of modern Pinzgauer came years later. Their name comes from the Pinzgau region of Salzburg, Austria, and is formally recognized in documents from the 1600s. Selective breeding is noted in Herd books from the 1700s. Records also show the cattle were being exported to surrounding countries as early as the 1820s. HISTORY: The fi rst Pinzgauer cattle arrived in North American in 1972, to Canada. The fullblood Austrian cattle came to the United States two years later. Since then live animals, embryos, and semen have been used to create the fullblood and purebred herds now found around the country. The American Pinzgauer Association allows producers to breed up to Purebred Pinzgauer (7/8 for females and 15/16 for bulls) utilizing Pinzgauer bulls and commercial cows. BREED CHARACTERISTICS: Pinzgauer cattle are known for their moderate size, fertility, longevity, feed effi ciency, above average weaning weights due to milk and maternal qualities, easy calving, and quiet temperament. They are noted Adult Pinzgauer bulls average between 2,000 and 2,600 pounds. for being adaptable to different climates, for having skin that prevents insect problems and for rarely having eye issues. REGISTRY ORGANIZATION: American Pinzgauer Association, located in Kingsville, Texas QUALITY AND YIELD: USDA MARC studies show that Pinzgauer-infl uenced steers average over 61% Choice, more than 69% Retail Product, and have a Ribeye Area of 11.28 sq in. BIRTH AND WEANING WEIGHT: Adult bulls average between 2,000 and 2,600 pounds. Females average around 1,300 to 1,600 pounds and routinely wean 600 to 800 pound calves due to milk that is high in butterfat. Birth weights average 70 to 80 pounds. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit the American Pinzgauer Association online at www.pinzgauers.org or call them at 361-296-5093. tenderness, with a shear force value of 4.47 kg. Angus ran a close second at 4.5 kg and other breeds were over 5.0 kg. Pinzgauer have been bred for tenderness and have the DNA tests to prove it, with a GeneStar rating of two stars or better for more than 84.8% of the Pinzgauers tested. In addition, Ferguson reports that Pinzgauer beef retains its tenderness without the use of artifi cial chemical processes because of a unique enzyme make-up they possess along with a hereditary tenderness gene. “Their beef is lean and well-marbled with a minimum amount of external fat,” Ferguson explains. “It is one of the most tender you will fi nd.” “Pinzgauer steers are also known for their feed effi ciency with above average daily gains and hanging carcass weights that often exceed 60 percent,” Ferguson adds. “Pinzgauers also work well in commercial herds. When crossed with American, British and other Continental breeds, you will see higher weaning and yearling weights, feed effi ciency, tenderness, calving ease, improved milk production, earlier slaughter weights, improved fertility and higher carcass weights. They produce fast gaining market animals and excellent replacement heifers.” As a smaller association, the APA is working hard to provide more genetic information to producers to assist with selection decisions as the breed interest grows and now provides more EPD information than ever before. “If fertility, calving ease, longevity, docility, heterosis, tenderness, carcass quality and performance in the feedlot are what you are looking for in your operation, then I would recommend Pinzgauer cattle,” Ferguson suggests. “One of the most important economic factors in any breeding program is fertility and Pinzgauer females are some of the best producing females around. They continually prove themselves year after year with each calf that hits the ground. If you are looking for bulls to get the job done right the fi rst time or steers to fatten on less feed, or beef that is juicy and tender, Pinzgauer cattle are for you.” Ferguson is proud of her family’s place with the Pinzgauer. She, her dad and daughter Shelby are passionate about these cattle. BIG KAHUNA - CIRCLE P PINZGAUERS Pinzgauer 90 I WORKING RANCH I MARCH 2018


Working Ranch - March 2018
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