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Working Ranch - November/December 2017

The relatives caring for the new orphans did not always present the greatest environment for the children. Although John didn’t like to talk much about his early days, it was well known that they were treated poorly by many uncaring relatives. By the seventh grade, his formal education, already very sporadic, ended. He made his way with odd jobs around town and out on the ranches. In later life, he liked to tell the story of when he decided to be a cowboy for a living and took a job breaking horses for room and board. In 1879, he’d been working as a cowboy for a while when he took a job with the Snyder-Wulfjen Brothers John Benjamin Kendrick was elected Governor of Wyoming on January 4, 1917. Kendrick was an advocate for Wyoming’s fi rst state game laws, workman’s compensation, a public utilities commission, women’s rights and he passed an important constitutional amendment to allow bank lending to farmers. out of Round Rock, Texas. A herd of 3,000 steers was contracted to be trailed from Matagorda Bay, Texas, to Wyoming, and John was assigned to his fi rst drive. Riding drag through the trail dust, river crossings and Indian country, they moved the herd about eighteen miles a day. He wrote about that fi rst trip: “We never saw a single habitation of man from a point in Texas, fi fty miles south of Red River, until we reached Dodge, Kansas, a distance of 400 miles. I do not remember coming in contact with or seeing a wire fence between Fort Worth, Texas and the head of the Running Water in Wyoming.” looking backBY BERT ENTWISTLE In 1860, a Texas cotton farmer named John Harvey Kendrick had the misfortune to get swept away in a swollen spring river and drown. His widow, Anna Maye, now left with two young children, died unexpectedly of fever three years later. The children, John Benjamin, age six, and his younger sister, Rosa, were shuffl ed between various family members for their care. Although there was a large estate that could have supported the children, the father’s outspoken support and investment in the Confederate cause cost the family everything when the war ended. Continued on page 153 TRAIL END GUILD 154 I WORKING RANCH I NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2017


Working Ranch - November/December 2017
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