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Working Ranch - November/December 2017

can be stillbirths, deformities or persistently infected calves. Persistently infected (PI) calves develop when the fetus is developing the lymphatic and the immune system. An infected calf will never build antibodies to the virus and is likely to appear normal at birth. Dr. Hansen says, in contrast, calves can also be born smaller in size and be poor-doers. The biggest problem, she explains, is that the calf might be born “normal” then shed the virus like crazy, thus infecting the herd. Transmission occurs through bodily fl uids like urine, feces, milk and semen. It is most detrimental during 120-150 days gestation, when it can result in PI calves shedding mass amounts of the virus. NOT ONE, BUT TWO! There are two types of BVD. Dr. Hansen says if a cow is infected with both types the result is a mucosal disease appearance, which looks similar to other diseases like foot and mouth or vesicular stomatitis. She says a veterinarian must pull blood and test for the specifi c disease to be sure. A questionable animal should be quarantined until the results are known. It is recommended if one calf tests positive for BVD the remaining calf crop should also be tested to fi nd any PI calves. BVD doesn’t impact bull fertility, but the big boys can pass it on during breeding season. Best to get them tested. Talk to your veterinarian. BVD could look something like this, or you may not see any symptoms at all. NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2017 I WORKING RANCH I 53


Working Ranch - November/December 2017
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