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Working Ranch - November/December 2017

PRODUCT INFORMATION NADA 141-299, Approved by FDA. (Florfenicol and Flunixin Meglumine) Antimicrobial/Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug For subcutaneous use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older or in calves to be processed for veal. BRIEF SUMMARY: For full prescribing information, see package insert. INDICATION: RESFLOR GOLD® is indicated for treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis, and control of BRD-associated pyrexia in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Do not use in animals that have shown hypersensitivity to florfenicol or flunixin. WARNINGS: NOT FOR HUMAN USE. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. This product contains material that can be irritating to skin and eyes. Avoid direct contact with skin, eyes, and clothing. In case of accidental eye exposure, flush with water for 15 minutes. In case of accidental skin exposure, wash with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing. Consult a physician if irritation persists. Accidental injection of this product may cause local irritation. Consult a physician immediately. The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) contains more detailed occupational safety information. For customer service or to obtain a copy of the MSDS, call 1-800-211-3573. For technical assistance or to report suspected adverse reactions, call 1-800-219-9286. Not for use in animals intended for breeding purposes. The effects of florfenicol on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy, and lactation have not been determined. Toxicity studies in dogs, rats, and mice have associated the use of florfenicol with testicular degeneration and atrophy. NSAIDs are known to have potential effects on both parturition and the estrous cycle. There may be a delay in the onset of estrus if flunixin is administered during the prostaglandin phase of the estrous cycle. The effects of flunixin on imminent parturition have not been evaluated in a controlled study. NSAIDs are known to have the potential to delay parturition through a tocolytic effect. RESFLOR GOLD®, when administered as directed, may induce a transient reaction at the site of injection and underlying tissues that may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 38 days of treatment. Do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older. Use of florfenicol in this class of cattle may cause milk residues. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. ADVERSE REACTIONS: Transient inappetence, diarrhea, decreased water consumption, and injection site swelling have been associated with the use of florfenicol in cattle. In addition, anaphylaxis and collapse have been reported post-approval with the use of another formulation of florfenicol in cattle. In cattle, rare instances of anaphylactic-like reactions, some of which have been fatal, have been reported, primarily following intravenous use of flunixin meglumine. Made in Germany Intervet Inc. Roseland, NJ 07068 ©2009, Intervet Inc. All Rights Reserved. May 2009 US 3448_IV Branding crew hard at ‘er on the Roberts Ranch, Colorado. CAITI HLADKY and Sherryl own personally. “We currently sell about 40 percent of the calf crop in January, as fi veweight calves. We keep a few steers to run over as yearlings and we keep a lot of heifers,” shares Thode, explaining how a relatively large number of replacement heifer candidates are managed under an extensive, low-input development program and estrus synchronized for artifi cial insemination. After early pregnancy detection, heifers found open are sold as feeders. “Heifers are our most liquid asset,” Thode states. Historically, Roberts Ranch ran straight Hereford cows and, as alluded to previously, they were subject to “limited management”. That’s defi - nitely not all bad, in Thode’s opinion, because the cows became pretty well adapted to the environment. Because they don’t eat much and they get pregnant every year, Thode wants to keep some of their “hard Hereford” genetics in the herd. However, he is using Angus and composite bulls to capitalize on the added productivity and longevity of crossbred cows. The mature cows run on range throughout the year, receiving little supplementation other than protein during the winter. Calving during May and June helps keep feed and labor costs low. “We try to keep cattle spread out in pastures. I believe that helps reduce sickness. We monitor the heifers so we can help with calving when needed, but the cows are on their own. We check them once per week,” says Thode. “We don’t tag calves,” he adds, noting how humans handling newborns can interfere with bonding between calves and their dams, and even spread infections. “Under our management system, I don’t see any real fi nancial advantage to tagging calves. I know the cost of labor involved is a fi nancial disadvantage.” Thode is all about cost-benefi t comparison. He’s more than a little leery of debt and advocates frugality in lifestyle as well as business, saying “keeping up with the Joneses” can get a rancher in trouble. Having the fastest horse or newest pickup seldom makes much difference to the ranch’s bottom line. Thode’s involvement in the online auction business has been used to good advantage, not only to save money but also make it. He buys used 78 I WORKING RANCH I NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2017


Working Ranch - November/December 2017
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