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Working Ranch - November/December 2017

Hereford bulls,” he said. Darrel liked to buy bulls as calves and grow them out himself. “I’d feed 3 pounds of oats per head per day and good hay, and they didn’t get too fat. They didn’t have feet problems and they lasted longer.” The Bagleys had Quarter Horse production sales at the ranch. “We ran our mares and foals on mountain pastures. The foals developed strong feet and legs and agility. We sold most of our horses as started 2-year-olds, and started them ourselves. Along with all our ranch chores we were always starting horses. We used our horses for everything – racing, rodeo, ranching – and we had a lot of fun,” Darrel said. He’d always wanted a ranch in Nebraska. “It’s not as dry as Idaho or Colorado. You don’t have to irrigate. You just cut meadows for hay, and don’t need much hay. You just check cows; it’s easy ranching. After the grandkids got out of high school I sold our Idaho ranches and bought a ranch in Nebraska in 1989. I traded a good horse for 12 registered Hereford bulls to take to Nebraska,” he said. The ranch bordered the North Platte River for 5 miles, lined with cottonwoods, so cattle had protection from blizzards. Darrel also planted 5000 trees for a shelterbelt around the catch pasture. “We had no intentions of selling that ranch, but then some folks came from Wyoming looking for a ranch and wanted to buy mine for twice what I paid for it. So we sold that ranch and looked for another place. Traudy and I drove through a lot of country and looked at a lot of ranches—and found one near Bonanza, Oregon. We bought it with the cattle on it, and also moved 100 of our fi rst calvers from Nebraska.” He bought a neighboring place with a 290-head BLM permit to add to the 180-head permit that surrounded his irrigated meadows. Darrel put up 800 acres of hay, all fl ood irrigated, and used the water 4 or 5 times before it got down to the hay meadows. “The former owner put ditches onto the juniper ridges; water fl ows down over 2000 acres and ends up on the meadows.” Today the ranch runs 500 cows. He put up round bales, fed by unrolling them with a tractor. “It’s an easy way to feed. I started doing that in Idaho and Nebraska because I never did like pitching hay!” When he passed away at age 90 he was still ranching, doing what he loved. Right Darrel with the grandkids. FAMILY PHOTO WHERE THE FUTURE OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT BEGINS At TCU, we don’t just produce great ranchers. We train serious resource managers to tackle the challenges of our rapidly changing global industry. Combining more than 50 years of tradition with the latest in ranching education, the TCU Ranch Management program offers nine months of intensive training both in the classroom and in the field. To learn more about our programs and scholarship opportunities, visit www.ranch.tcu.edu or call 817-257-7145. NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2017 I WORKING RANCH I 97


Working Ranch - November/December 2017
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