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Zoonotic Diseases Don’t catch me if you can Diseases that can be passed between animals and humans are called Some things you can do to help protect yourself: Wash your hands after handling cattle or other animals, especially before eating anything. Make sure to use soap! Wear rubber gloves when processing cattle, or doing any other cattle work where you are coming into contact with blood or other body fl uids. Wearing food grade gloves is a good idea when you are handling raw meat. Wash anything that came into contact with raw meat. All meat should be cooked to the right temperature. For ground beef, you want the center to be 165° F and the juices to be clear. Make sure that your drinking water comes from a safe source. Avoid wearing dirty work boots and clothes in the house. zoonotic diseases. Some of these diseases can just make you sick, while others can actually cause death. There are many ways that you and your cattle can pick up a zoonotic disease, all depending on the disease. Some ways that they can spread are by insect bites, through the air, through water, by direct contact or by eating undercooked contaminated meat. Thankfully, a lot of these diseases are not very common and there are things that we can do to help protect ourselves from getting them. I encourage you to research these diseases and to do your best to avoid them. If you ever have questions about an animal’s health, or your own health when it comes to zoonotic diseases, ask your veterinarian, and remember to be safe! Zoonotic diseases that can be found in cattle: Escherichia coli Salmonellosis Ringworm Campylobacter Giardiasis Cryptosporidiosis Listeriosis Leptospirosis Dermatophilosis Rabies Q fever Pseudocowpox Vesicular Stomatitis Brucellosis Tuberculosis Anthrax STRANNIK_FOX DREAMSQUARE BY KATIE STOREY, OHIO, AGE 15 KITSANANAN PAWEL MICHALOWSKI 4 I WORKING RANCH JUNIOR I SUMMER 2016


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