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LEFT: Freezing the image on the screen to evaluate later. RIGHT: Darian enjoys showing people the calves on the screen, and explaining what she is looking for to determine pregnancy. SHAWNA ROGHAIR SHAWNA ROGHAIR dad and our ultrasound technician, Cole Briggs, encouraged me to get an ultrasound machine. It was about a year before I decided that doing ultrasound was something I wanted to invest my time and money into. Before I was ready to go on my own though, I went with Cole a few times on his ultrasound jobs to get more practice and a feel for it. It was a great experience, and it wasn’t long until I was ready to go on my own, so I got my machine, the Ibex Pro, probe and arms-free stick, from E.I. Medical Imaging. 14 The fi rst year business AGE was slow. I had gotten my machine late in the year so ROGHAIR,lots of ranchers already had their ultrasounding done ANNALEE for the year. Even so, I still ended up doing ultrasounds on 1,672 head that fi rst fall and winter of 2014. After every bunch of cows I got faster and more effi cient at my job. It didn’t take long for my business Darian gets ready for another busy day of preg-checking. to spread by word of mouth, and the following year I was really busy. It was great to be able to do so many cows with so many different dispositions in so many different setups. It wasn’t always easy though. Some cows are so big and deep that if the calf has dropped over the pelvis, it’s a real challenge to fi nd. A couple times by the end of the day my arm felt like it was about to fall off from the constant movement. School was a challenge too. Being homeschooled gives me lots of fl exibility but missing days and having to catch up can be frustrating sometimes, especially when I feel like what I am learning from my work is worth just as much as what Mom teaches me in school. When someone wants to schedule a job, Dad takes a look at his calendar for open days. Usually the day before a job, I check all my gear and make sure my batteries for the machine are full. When I get to the place where the cows are to be worked, I usually talk to the ramrod of the outfi t to fi nd out where I can set up, when the bulls were put out with the cows, and when they were pulled, etc. Then I set up my gear and let the crew know that I’m ready. I average doing 60 cows an hour, usually checking them as fast as the crew can bring them down the chute. Using the arms-free stick really makes it easier on my arms. I enjoy showing people the calves on the screen and how to see if the cow is bred or open. Sometimes I have to tell the age on a calf, and I am still working on getting better at that. I haven’t learned to tell the sex on calves yet. I would like to learn how someday, but I fi gure it’s not that important because you fi nd out what it is when the calf hits the ground. My work has taught me a lot about business, like how to manage money and time, responsibility and how to deal with different people. It has pulled me out of my comfort zone and it’s given me a good start to my future. I don’t know if I’ll be doing this as a business for my entire life but it’s given me something to build on until I fi gure out what I want to do. All in all, it’s a great job and I hope it challenges other kids to fi nd what they love to do and to stick with it. SUMMER 2017 I WORKING RANCH JUNIOR I 23


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